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#29 John Torp
Position: Punter
Height: 6'2"
Weight: 205
Year: Senior
City/State: Louisville, Colo.
High School: Monarch
Experience: 2 Letters

 

2005 (Sr.)—One of three finalists for the Ray Guy Award (he finished as the runner-up for the honor), he earned first-team all-Big 12 Conference honors from the league coaches (second-team by the Associated Press), while being named second-team All-America by the Walter Camp Foundation (and honorable mention from SI.com).  For the year, including the bowl game, he finished third in the Big 12 and fifth in the NCAA in punting with a 45.2 average on 80 punts, with 31 kicks of 50 yards or longer (six 60-plus) and 28 placed inside-the-20 (10 inside-the-10, five inside-the-5).  He led the nation much of the season, but abnormally brutal windy conditions at Kansas State and Iowa State caused him to fall off a bit.  He won the gross punting battle with opponent punters 23 of 26 times in his junior and senior seasons combined (the net 24 times), as he proved equally effective on the road as he has in Boulder.  In one of his best games, he averaged 47.0 on seven punts at Miami (elevation: 7 feet), and other strong numbers included a 50.1 average in the fourth quarter (12 punts, six inside-the-20), and a 46.7 average on punts in CU territory.  In the bowl game against Clemson, he again had one of the top postseason efforts by any punter, owning a 49.7 average for nine punts, including four inside-the-20 and a CU all-time bowl best kick of 68 yards (he had four over 52 yards in the game).  Following the year in the Senior Bowl, he punted five times for a 38.0 average, with a long of 53 and two punts inside the 20.  He owns seven of the top 25 gross punting days in school history, four his junior season and three as a senior: 52.3-yard average efforts versus Colorado State (2004) and New Mexico State (2005) are tied for the 10th best all-time and are his top efforts.  He also owns four of the top 20 net punting games, topped by a 50.7 net average against NMSU.  He finished fifth all-time at Colorado in gross career average (44.61), first in total punts (205), first in punts inside-the-20 (65) and first in punts of 50 yards or longer (64, with 17 over 60 yards).  For his career, he placed 22 punts inside-the-10, also a school best, and had just 18 touchbacks in 205 punts.  He owned the fourth highest average of active punters in the NCAA at 44.71 at the end of his senior year (includes bowl games).       

 

2004 (Jr.)—He was the second-team all-Big 12 punter (Associated Press, Big 12 Coaches), though the Austin American-Statesman made him their first-team choice; arguably was the best punter in the nation in 2004, but once eliminated from the Ray Guy Award (for having too many punts returned through nine games) and losing out to Baylor senior Daniel Sepulveda (the eventual Guy winner) for official first-team all-Big 12 honors, All-America honors for him were pretty much out of the question (ESPN.com selected him as the punter on its All-America team, with SI.com tabbing him honorable mention).  Some used the old altitude argument against him (though no opponent punter topped him in six games in Boulder), but his 43.7 road average alone would have still ranked him 11th in the NCAA.  He was first in the Big 12 and second in the NCAA with a 46.54 average (includes the bowl game), and it gets better looking inside his numbers: he averaged 49.6 on 19 kicks inside the Buff 25, as well as 47.5 yards per punt on CU’s side of the field.  He had 22 punts inside-the-20 to set a school record (32 percent of his 68 kicks).  His punting has paved the way for Colorado to lead the nation in net punting with a 42.43 average, 1.29 yard ahead of runner-up BYU.  He owned an average of 42.1 on 15 fourth quarter punts (6 In20, 3 In10), and inside-the-CU25, he had five fourth quarter kicks for 255 yards, or 51.0 per; one of those kicks came late in CU’s 27-24 victory over CSU, as he boomed a 61-yarder to get the Buffs out of a hole at their own 16 yardline with 4:30 remaining.  Only five of his kicks went for touchbacks; nine were downed, 14 fair caught and 40 returned for a paltry 6.7 average (21st in the NCAA, and lower than those of the three Guy Award finalists).  He earned his way on CU’s prestigious Victory Club, as those who make it must post a winning productivity grade in at least eight games, and was CU’s special teams player of the week three times (CSU, OSU and Texas).  Against UTEP in the bowl game, he averaged 50.0 yards on four punts, with a long of 58 and one inside-the-20.  He was one of 36 original players on the Guy Award watch list but his returned punt count prohibited him from making the 10-member semifinalist group. 

 

2003 (Soph.)—He played in all 12 games, as he was CU’s regular punter, finishing fourth in the Big 12 and 31st in the nation in punting with a 42.5 average.  His 63 punts overall tied for the fifth most ever in a single season at Colorado, with 16 placed inside-the-20 (eight inside-the-10), with 14 traveling 50 yards or longer and four 60-yards plus.  He owned a 42.1 average on 21 punts inside CU’s 25, and a 44.0 average for 57 kicks on CU’s side of the 50.  While the average return of his kicks went for 10.2 yards, only 31 of 63 were returned, with another six fair caught (and just four touchbacks).  He executed both his fake punt attempts, the first for a 20-yard run against No. 1 Oklahoma that was the key play in a 76-yard touchdown march by the Buffs, and the second a week later for 10 yards in another scoring drive at Texas Tech.  A fairly talented defender, he was in on three tackles, two being touchdown saves, after return men eluded CU’s aggressors on his kicks.  The downside was that four of his punts were blocked, leading to a 37.3 net average (Kansas State busted through to block two of those).  He booted both his career long and short kicks in the same game: in the finale against Nebraska, he got off a 69-yard bomb in the first quarter, but with the winds picking up, his last kick of the day went for just four yards, the only negative to an otherwise spectacular day (six punts, also including a 60-yard boot, and a 44.5 average).  He was CU’s special teams player of the week for two games, versus Colorado State (10 punts for a 40.8 average with three inside the 20 in the rain) and Missouri (a 50.7 average on six punts, with three inside-the-20 and punts of 61, 60 and 55 yards).

 

2002 (Fr.-RS)—He was the backup to Mark Mariscal, thus he had an up-close view of the nation’s 2002 Ray Guy Award winner.  He did punt three times for a 49.7 average, all three placed inside-the-20 with a long of 63.  His net average on the three kicks was a more than healthy 49.3.

 

2001—Redshirted; practiced at both punter and placekicker his first year on campus.

 

HIGH SCHOOL—As a senior, he earned all-conference honors for the third straight year when he scored 57 points, as he made good of 45-of-50 extra points and 4-of-6 field goal tries (with a long of 43).  He also owned a 40.3 average for 25 punts, including a long of 65 and three inside-the-20.  As a junior, he was 53-of-56 on PAT kicks and a perfect 4-of-4 in field goals, with a long of 45.  He averaged 35.8 yards on 15 punts.  Monarch was 9-3 his senior year, winning the league title and making the state playoffs, and was 8-3 his junior and 9-3 his sophomore seasons under coach Phil Bravo.  He also lettered three times in soccer, earning all-conference honors as a sophomore, and three times in track (hurdles).  He holds four school records in track: 110 and 300 hurdles, long jump and 2x400 relay.

 

ACADEMICS—He is majoring in both political science and economics at Colorado, and intends to going to law school after he graduates.  He earned second-team Academic All-Big 12 Conference honors as a senior, and is also a two-time member of the Big 12 Commissioner’s Honor Roll (his sophomore and junior seasons).  He was one of 62 official nominations for the prestigious Vincent Draddy Trophy, considered the “academic” Heisman.  In high school, he was an American Mathematic Award winner and earned All-Academic honors as a senior.

 

PERSONAL—Born August 19, 1982 in Seattle, Wash.  Hobbies include skiing and photography.  An older brother (Karl) is a news anchor for CBS/FOX 12 in Jacksonville, Fla., while a younger sister, Anne-Marie, plays basketball at Utah State.

 


Season


G


No


Yds


Avg


Long

In
20


50+

had
blk

Ret
Yds

Net
Yds

Net
Avg

2002

2

3

149

49.7

63

3

1

0

1

148

49.3

2003

12

63

2679

42.5

69

16

14

4

326

2353

37.3

2004

12

68

3151

46.3

63

22

22

0

266

2885

42.4

2005

12

71

3166

44.6

72

24

27

1

216

2770

39.0

Totals

38

205

9145

44.6

72

65

64

5

809

8156

39.8

 

 ADDITIONAL STATISTICS—Rushing: 3-16, 5.3 avg., 20 long (2003); 1-17, 17.0 avg., 17 long (2005).  Passing: 1-1-0, -2 (2004); Special Team Tackles: 2,1—3 (2003); 1,0-1 (2005)

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