MEMBER SIGN IN
Don't have an account? Click Here
NCAA Cross Country Champions
Print
#16 Mason Crosby
Position: Place Kicker
Height: 6'2"
Weight: 215
Year: Senior
City/State: Georgetown, Texas
High School: Georgetown
Experience: 3 Letters

AT COLORADO—Career Notes: He became just the seventh two-time, first-team All-American in CU history, as well as only the seventh three-time, first-team All-Conference performer. Crosby set 33 single-game, season and career records at Colorado, most notably becoming the school’s all-time leading scorer with 307 points. He set or tied 19 of the school’s 38 placekicking records, including all of the major marks: field goals made (66), field goals attempted (88), extra points made (109), extra point attempts (117), field goal percentage (75.0) and longest field goal made (60 yards). He made 12 career kicks of 50 yards or longer (the previous record had been three), as he owns nine of the 14 longest kicks in CU history. He excelled in late game heroics, making a name for himself in the clutch: he was 14-of-18 in the fourth quarter, including 12-of-14 in the final 9½ minutes with nine kicks of 41 yards or longer and seven of them with the score of the game within six points; his only misses came his senior year: a 63-yard try against Montana State as CU tried to rally in the waning minutes (2 yards short) and a 65-yard try in a bid to tie the NCAA record without a tee against Iowa State (27-inches short). He made 32-of-43 field goals outside of the state of Colorado, the average make from 36.8 yards and the average miss from 43.4 yards (included three blocked; 47.0 otherwise). In addition, he kicked off 203 times, with 138 going for touchbacks (88 through the end zone), all school records, with the average starting yardline of the opponent its 22 after his kicks; 20 of 61 returned against him were not brought out beyond the 20. In the postseason, he finished fourth all-time in scoring with 19 points in bowls (5-of-7 FG, 4-of-4 PAT), the second in kick scoring, trailing only Aldrich, one of the few records of his that he did not break. He also exited as the Big 12 Conference all-time leader in field goals made, attempted and percentage.

2006 (Sr.)—The nation’s premier placekicker, as evidenced by him being the unanimous first-team All-American in every notable preseason publication: Athlon, CBS SportsLine.com, collegefootballnews.com, Lindy’s Big 12 Football, Football.com, Football News, Nationalchamps.net, Phil Steele’s College Football, Playboy, Rivals.com, The Sporting News and Street & Smith’s. After the season, he officially earned two-time first-team All-America status when he was named to the Walter Camp team; Pro Football Weekly, sensing his draft position, also tabbed him first-team, while the Associated Press named him third-team. He again earned first-team All-Colorado and Special Team Player of the Year honors from the state’s chapter of the National Football Foundation, and earned a special citation from the Colorado Sports Hall of Fame for season and career achievement. The lone Buff invited to play in the Senior Bowl, the first CU placekicker ever extended an invitation to the all-star game, he scored nine points in the game helping the North to a 27-0 win (3-3 PAT, 2-2 FG, from 38 and 21 yards). One of three team captains, he became the seventh player in Colorado history to be named first-team all-conference three times, when the AP and the Big 12 coaches tabbed for the third straight year. As a senior, he made 19-of-28 field goals, though most of the misses were from long range; he was a solid 17-of-19 inside 50 yards, as good as any one in the country (one of the two misses was blocked). His 19 makes covered 772 yards, or 40.6 per, while his nine misses averaged 52.1 yards in length—both tops in the NCAA. He made good on all 19 PAT kicks, as he ended his career making 57 in a row, the second longest streak in school history. In scoring 76 points to lead the team, he joined Tom Field, Eric Bieniemy and Jeremy Aldrich as the only players to lead CU in scoring three times, with only he and Aldrich doing it in three straight seasons. He was named the Big 12’s special teams player of the week for two games (Texas Tech and Iowa State), giving him a conference-record nine for his career. Against Tech, he converted all three field goal tries, including 56- and 53-yard kicks, three PAT kicks with five of seven kickoffs for touchbacks. In the Iowa State game, he made good on 4-of-5 field goals (the miss was a 65-yard try that fell 27 inches short), with four of eight kickoffs for touchbacks and three others inside-the-20. He was named the winner of CU’s Bill McCartney Award, for special teams achievement, for a third time, and was a semifinalist for the Lou Groza Award, though he was snubbed by the committee (the general consensus nationally was that the three best kickers in the nation were all overlooked). At one time he was considered a candidate to also handle the punting chores (he had one punt in the opener against Montana State for 43 yards, but preferred to stick with the placekicking chores); he did average 49.5 yards for eight punts in the three major spring scrimmages. He put on a show in the spring game, connecting on 7-of-16 field goals: his average make was 46 yards, the average “miss” from 55, as he tried kicks in poor weather conditions from 70, 69, 68, 65 and 62 yards to entertain the fans.

2005 (Jr.)—The runner-up for the Lou Groza Award (by just six points to Oregon State’s Alexis Serna), he became the first placekicker in Colorado history to earn first-team All-America honors, doing it in consensus fashion as he was honored by the Associated Press, the Football Writers Association of America, The Sporting News, SI.com, Walter Camp and Rivals.com. He was also the unanimous selection for first-team All-Big 12 honors from both the AP and league coaches, and was the pick for the Big 12 Special Teams Player-of-the-Year by the coaches. He also earned first-team All-Colorado team honors from the state’s chapter of the National Football Foundation, which also selected him as the state’s special teams POY. He had an amazing list of accomplishments for the season, the crown jewel being a 58-yard field goal at Miami, Fla., the longest ever at sea level (7 feet) without a kicking tee in NCAA Division I-A history. He led the team in scoring with 94 points, converting all 31 PAT kicks (he has made 38 consecutive) and 21-of-28 field goals; he led the nation in the average distance per field goal made at an astounding 41.2 yards. He strung together a school record 10 straight field goals made between the end of his sophomore year and his junior season, in both of which he led the NCAA in field goals made from 50 yards or longer (six in 2004, five in 2005). Of the five 50-plus he made on the season, four came on the road. He had the first two game-winning kicks of his career; in opening his junior season in grand style on his 21st birthday (Sept. 3), he scored 11 points (3-3 FG, 2-2 PAT) in the 31-28 win over Colorado State. Those included a 48-yard field goal to tie the score at 21-21 with 2:32 left, and a game-winning 47-yard boot with 0:04 on the clock. Later in the year at Kansas State, and after already making a 52-yard kick in the second quarter, he drilled a 50-yarder with six seconds left in swirling winds to beat the Wildcats, 23-20. That tied his own school record for 50-plus yard kicks made is a game. For his career, he is 23-of-25 from 40 yards and in, as well as a most impressive 24-of-35 from 41 yards or longer. He has now been selected the Big 12 Special Teams Player-of-the-Week seven times in his career (CSU, Miami, Kansas State and Missouri games as a junior to go with the Iowa State and Nebraska games in 2004 and for the Kansas game in 2003). That puts him in select company, as the seven are tied for the most in a career with two other players in Big 12 history: RB Ricky Williams (Texas, 1996-98) and QB Eric Crouch (NU, 1998-2001). Williams was recognized five times in 1998 (Heisman season); Crosby, this year, and Texas Tech QB Kliff Kingsbury ('02) are the only others to honored at least four times in a season. In addition, the Lou Groza Award Committee named him one of its three “Stars of the Week” the times, making it four in his career (Iowa State in ’04; CSU, Miami and K-State in ’05). In the Champs Sports Bowl against Clemson, he made good on his only two kicks, a 36-yard field goal and a PAT. The CU coaches again selected him as the recipient for the Bill McCartney Award for special teams achievement, and he was also just one of nine players to earn his way on to CU’s prestigious Victory Club list (minimum eight games with a high productivity grade). He was a near unanimous selection for preseason first-team All-America honors, including being named to the prestigious Playboy team.

2004 (Soph.)—He was the unanimous first-team All-Big 12 placekicker and one of 20 semifinalists for the Lou Groza Award, though the main All-America teams didn’t throw anything his way. Rivals.com selected him as a second-team All-American and SI.com tabbed him with honorable mention status. He led the NCAA in field goals made from 50-plus yards with six (topping Ohio State’s Mike Nugent, the Groza winner, who had five), and connected on 23-of-29 on the season (19-of-23 during the regular season, 4-of-6 in the bowl game). He led the Big 12 and was sixth in the nation in field goals made per game (1.77), and became just the 10th player in NCAA history to make a 60-yard or longer field goal without a tee when he nailed a 60-yarder against Iowa State, the longest in the nation in 2004. It was one of four field goals he had in CU’s 19-14 win; in fact, he also had a 54-yard kick in that game, becoming the first CU player to make two of 50-plus yards in the same game. The Groza committee cited him as one of its Three Stars of the Week Award winner for his performance against the Cyclones, while he was the Colorado Chapter/NFF player of the week for the same. The five 50-plus yard kicks he made during the regular season, the first five of his career, set CU career and season marks. He scored 85 total points to lead the team, as he also had another 4-field goal game at Nebraska, and was a deadly weapon on kickoffs. Overall, he was third in the league and 34th in the nation in scoring (7.7 points per game), a number that ranked him first and sixth, respectively, in kick scoring in the Big 12 and NCAA. Including the bowl, of his 67 kickoffs, only 18 were returned (seven inside-the-20), with 48 going for touchbacks (30 through the end zone). The opponent average starting yardline after all his kicks was the 21, and just the 22 for the 18 returned. In the bowl win over Texas-El Paso, he made good on field goals from 26, 54, 37 and 20 yards with seven kickoffs going for touchbacks (with the eighth returned to just the 18). He was CU’s special teams player of the week on four occasions, and the Big 12 Conference’s for the Iowa State and Nebraska games.He won the Bill McCartney Award as the most outstanding special teams player as selected by the coaches for both the fall as well as for spring practice, and was one of just 10 players to earn his way on CU’s prestigious Victory Club.

2003 (Fr.)—He set a Colorado record for the most points scored by a freshman with 52 (the old record of 48 was shared by two players). He was only the second true frosh to handle the placekicking chores in a CU season opener in school history, and only the fifth to see any action, period. The Big 12 Conference (and the CU coaches) honored him as the Special Teams Player of the Week for October 11, as he was 3-of-3 on PAT kicks, 3-of-3 on field goals (23, 41 and 23 yards, the latter coming with 0:14 on the clock to send the game into overtime) and kicked off for the first time collegiately, sending eight of nine kickoffs into the end zone for touchbacks (with the one that was returned going for just five yards to the Kansas 18). For the season, he made 7-of-9 field goals, as he was perfect from 44 yards in with his misses coming from 47 and 53 yards; he made 31-of-37 PAT kicks, with three of the misses coming on blocks. His long of 44 yards came in the season finale against Nebraska, while his first career make from 40 yards out against UCLA tied for the fifth longest for the first in a CU kicker’s career in Buff history. He made the first five field goals of his career, one shy of the record for the most at the start of a CU career. He kicked off 37 times on the year, with 26 going for touchdowns with just 10 returned for an average starting field position for the opponent at its own 23.

HIGH SCHOOL—As a senior, he earned first-team all-district honors (13-5A) at placekicker, punter and free safety, and was All-Central Texas at kicker. PrepStar named him to its All-Midlands team, while Rivals.com ranked him as the No. 3 placekicker in the nation. He was first-team all-district and second-team all-region at kicker as a junior. As a senior, he converted 7-of-11 field goals (long of 59) and 23-of-25 extra point kicks; he owned a 39.8 average for 40 punts (61 long), with 10 inside-the-20 and five inside-the-5. He also kicked 60-plus yard field goals consistently in practice. At free safety, he had 78 tackles (26 solo), eight for losses, three interceptions, three passes broken up, three forced fumbles and two recoveries. As a junior, he made 8-of-10 field goals (52 long) and 17-of-20 PATs (all misses were blocked). He averaged 37 yards on 60 punts (64 long), with eight inside-the-20. He had 58 tackles (25 solo, 10 for losses), with three interceptions, four passes broken up, three hurries and two fumble recoveries. Top career games included a 30-20 loss to Copperas Cove as a junior, when he made three field goals (52, 46 and 39 yards) against a team that came in with five straight shutouts. In a 10-3 loss to Cedar Park his senior year, he made the longest field goal in Texas in eight years when he drilled a career-best 59-yarder; it tied him for the third longest in state history. He also had a 61-yard punt in the game. And in a 21-7 win over Round Rock as a senior, he had seven tackles and two interceptions, returning one for a touchdown and kicking the PAT following the score. Georgetown was 5-5 his senior year and 6-4 his junior season under coach Larry Moore. He also earned two letters in soccer (defense/midfielder), earning all-district honors as both a sophomore (14 goals) and junior (17 goals).

ACADEMICS—He graduated with a bachelor’s degree in communication in December 2006. He was a consistent member of the “A-B” honor roll throughout high school (five out of six semesters).

PERSONAL—He was born September 3, 1984 in Lubbock, Texas. His hobbies include hunting (deer/exotic), fishing, hiking, basketball and golf (he owns a single-digit handicap). Father (Jim) was a fullback at Texas-El Paso in the mid-1970s, and a grandfather (Harry Crosby) ran track at Marshall. He spent two years in Fort Collins as a youngster, and attended several CU games during that time and became a Buff fan. In high school, he was very active in his community, including local mission and church youth group work. Many kickers have interesting rituals or superstitions; his is to hit at least 60 golf balls at a driving range two days before a game.

Scoring/Field Goals

Season

PAT

10-19

20-29

30-39

40-49

50-59

60+

FG-FGA

Pct.

Long

Pts

2003

31-37

0-0

4-4

0-0

3-4

0-1

0-0

7-9

77.8

44

52

2004

28-30

1-1

5-5

5-5

3-5

4-6

1-1

19-23

82.6

60

85

2005

31-31

0-0

3-4

5-6

8-11

5-7

0-0

21-28

75.0

58

94

2006

19-19

0-0

5-6

7-8

5-5

2-5

0-3

19-28

67.9

56

76

Totals

109-117

1-1

17-19

17-19

19-25

11-20

1-4

66-88

75.0

60

307

*Road 36-40 1-1 9-11 10-11 7-11 5-9 0-0 32-43 74.4 58  

 

Kickoffs

Opp.

Season

Total

Ret.

FC

TB

In20

EZ+

OB

O/Sq

OSY

ASY

2003

37

10

0

26

2

17

1

(1)

847

O23

2004

59

17

1

41

6

26

0

(1)

1215

O21

2005

61

18

0

43

4

33

0

(3)

1357

O22

2006

46

17

0

28

8

12

1

(3)

989

O22

Totals

203

62

1

138

20

88

2

(8)

4408

O22

*Road

81

35

1

44

8

25

1

(4)

1766

O22

ADDITIONAL STATISTICS—Special Team Tackles: 2,0—2 (2003); Punting: 1-43, 43.0 avg. (2006). (*—road and neutral games outside of Colorado)

(KEY: FC—fair caught; TB—touchbacks; OB—out of bounds; EZ+—through or over end zone; OSY—Opponent Starting Yardline; ASY—Average Starting Yardline; Onsides and short squibs (O/Sq) and free kicks are omitted in figuring the above; out-of-bounds are not. Bowl games NOT included.


MASON CROSBY’S COLORADO RECORDS (33)

RECORDS SET
Most Games Played, Specialist—
48, 2003-06 (regular season; 50 played including two bowls)
Most Extra Points Made, Career— 109, 2003-06 (117 attempts)
Most Extra Points Attempted, Career— 117, 2003-06
Most Field Goals Made, Career— 66, 2003-06 (88 attempts)
Most Field Goals Attempted, Career— 88, 2003-06 (66 made)
Consecutive Field Goals Made— 10, Nov. 6, 2004 to Sept. 10, 2005 (five games)
Most Consecutive Game Kicking A Field Goal— 11, Nov. 6, 2004 to Oct. 15, 2005 (last five games in 2004, first six in 2005)
Most Field Goals Made, Season— 21, 2005
*Longest Field Goal Made— 60, vs. Iowa State in Boulder, Oct. 16, 2004
*Longest Field Goal Attempt— 65, vs. Iowa State in Boulder, Nov. 11, 2006
Most 50-Yard Plus Field Goals Made, Game — 2, on three occasions (Iowa State 2004, Kansas 2005, Texas Tech 2006)
Most 50-Yard Plus Field Goals Made, Season — 5, 2004 and 2005.
Most 50-Yard Plus Field Goals Made, Career— 12, 2003-06.
Most 50-Yard Plus Field Goals Attempted, Career— 24, 2003-06 (12 made)
Average Distance Of Field Goals Made, Game (min. 3 made)— 48.0 vs. Kansas State at Manhattan, Oct. 29, 2005 (52, 42, 50)
Average Distance Of Field Goals Made, Season (min. 10 made)— 41.2 (21 field goals, 865 yards)
Average Distance Of Field Goals Made, Career (min. 10 made/season)— 38.2 (66 field goals, 2519 yards)
Most Points Scored/Season, Freshman— 52, 2003 (7 FG, 31 PAT)
Most Points Scored, Career— 307, 2003-06 (66 FG, 109 PAT)
Most Points Scored By Kicking, Career— 307, 2003-06 (66 FG, 109 PAT)
Most Points Scored Against One Opponent, Career— 46 vs. Iowa State, 2003-06
Most Points Scored By Kicking Against One Opponent, Career— 46 vs. Iowa State, 2003-06
Most Games Scored In— 50, 2003-06
Most Consecutive Games Scored In— 50, 2003-06
Most Kickoffs, Career— 203, 2003-06
Most Kickoff Touchbacks, Career— 138, 2003-06
Most Kickoffs Through End Zone, Career— 88, 2003-06
Most Big 12 Player of the Week Honors— 9, 2003-06

RECORDS TIED
Field Goal Percentage, Career— 75.0, 2003-06 (66 of 88)
Longest Field Goal Made, Road — 58, vs. Miami, Fla., at Miami, Sept. 24, 2005 (NCAA record at sea level without a tee)
Most Kickoffs Through End Zone, Season— 33 (matched record set by Mitch Berger, 1992)

*— also Folsom Field records.

CROSBY'S LATE GAME HEROICS

Crosby made a name for himself in the clutch, as he was 14-of-18 in the 4th quarter, including 12-of-14 in the final 9½ minutes with nine kicks of 41 yards or longer and seven of them with the score of the game within six points; his only misses were a 63-yard try against Montana State as CU tried to rally in the waning minutes (2 yards short) and a 65-try in a bid to tie the NCAA record without a tee against Iowa State (27-inches short). A closer look:

  Score Prior   Revised  
Season Opponent To Kick Time Left Kick Score Notes
2003 Kansas 38-44

41-44
5:24 4Q

0:14 4Q
41 FG

23 FG
41-44

44-44
puts CU in position where it needs a FG and not a TD to win or send into OT
sends game into OT, where CU wins
2004 Colorado State 17-17 6:43 4Q 55 FG 20-17 margin of victory in 27-24 win
  @Washington State 17-12 4:42 4Q 41 FG 20-12 holds up as final score
  Iowa State 16-7 8:28 4Q 33 FG 19-7 CU wins it, 19-14
  @Texas A&M 19-13 12:37 4Q 50 FGA -- missed wide left
  Oklahoma (@K.C.) 0-35 2:01 3Q 34 FG 3-35 basically meaningless, but a pressure kick to extend CU scoring streak to 196 games
2005 Colorado State 18-21
28-28
2:32 4Q
0:04 4Q
48 FG
47 FG
21-21
31-28
completed 11-point rally by the Buffaloes
game winner
  @Miami, Fla. 0-16 11:57 4Q 58 FG 3-16 extends CU scoring streak to 200 games, gets CU back in it even though momentarily
  @Oklahoma State 24-0 2:07 4Q 42 FG 27-0 icing on the cake
  @Kansas State 20-20 0:06 4Q 50 FG 23-20 game winner; CU actually downed the ball and lost 7 yards on purpose to set up kick
  Missouri 38-12 8:16 4Q 43 FG 41-12 tacked on the game's final points
  @Iowa State 13-23 11:25 4Q 57 FG 16-23 pulled CU back to within one score, but CU's tying drive ended in interception return TD
2006 Montana State 10-19 1:11 4Q 63 FGA -- just short on the try as CU attempted to rally; the 63 yard FGA longest ever at CU at the time
  Arizona State 3-21 10:27 4Q 57 FGA -- kick was wide left, affected by winds gusting to 20 mph
  @Oklahoma 0-17 6:13 4Q 39 FG 3-17 kick averted CU's first shutout loss since 1988, second latest CU scored during streak
  Iowa State 30-10
33-10
9:20 4Q
5:22 4Q
42 FG
65 FGA
33-10
--
fourth field goal of game
tried the longest field goal in school history on his last-ever attempt at home, fell 27 inches short

"THE" KICK

Mason Crosby’s 58-yard field goal at Miami on Sept. 24, 2005, elevation seven feet, is the longest field goal in NCAA history at sea level without the use of a kicking tee (all kicks after 1988 are without one). It tied for the third longest, tee or not, at altitude in college and for the fifth longest when including the National Football League. Seeing how he accomplished something most kickers who kick at lower altitudes historically never do, this should end once and for all the altitude arguments used against CU kickers and punters when it comes to All-America and trophy consideration. (In fact, four of his five 50-plus yard kicks in 2005 came on the road, including a 57-yard boot in horrific wind at Iowa State .)  A closer look:

LONGEST FIELD GOALS AT SEA LEVEL (NFL OR NCAA I-A)

(sea level defined as 100 feet or lower; *—denotes used tee)

Yds 

Player, Team/School, Opponent, Site, Date (Altitude)

63 

Tom Dempsey, New Orleans vs. Detroit (NFL) in New Orleans, Nov. 8, 1970 (3 ft.)

60 

Morten Andersen, New Orleans vs. Chicago (NFL) in New Orleans, Oct. 27, 1991 (3 ft.)

60 

*Bubba Hicks, Baylor vs. Rice in Houston, Nov. 29, 1975 (43 ft.)

59 

*Tony Franklin, Texas A&M vs. Rice in Houston, Nov. 15, 1975 (43 ft.)

58 

Mason Crosby, Colorado vs. Miami, Fla., at Miami, Sept. 24, 2005 (7 ft.)

58 

*Kendall Trainor, Arkansas vs. Miami, Fla., at Miami, Nov. 26, 1988 (7 ft.)

58 

*Jeff Heath, East Carolina vs. UT-Arlington at Greenville, N.C., Nov. 6, 1982 (56 ft.)

58 

Nick Lowery, Kansas City vs. Washington (NFL) at Washington, Sept. 18, 1983 (23 ft.)

58 

Pete Stoyanovich, Miami vs. Kansas City (NFL) in Miami, Jan. 5, 1991 (7 ft.)

57 

*Rafael Septien, Louisiana-Lafayette vs. Lamar in Lafayette, La., Oct. 5, 1974 (minus-2 ft.)

Other college under 200 feet:

60 

*Chris Perkins, Florida vs. Tulane at Gainesville, Sept. 15, 1984 (177 ft.)

60 

*Don Schaefer, USC vs. Notre Dame in Los Angeles, Nov. 29, 1986 (170 ft.)


TOP FIELD GOALS OF 50 YARDS OR LONGER IN COLORADO HISTORY

(31 overall, top 14 listed through October 14, 2006)

Yds 

Player,  Opponent, Site, Date

60 

Mason Crosby vs. Iowa State in Boulder, October 16, 2004

58 

Mason Crosby vs. Miami, Fla., at Miami, September 24, 2005

58 

Jerry Hamilton vs. Iowa State at Ames, October 24, 1981

57 

Dave DeLine vs. Nebraska in Boulder, October 25, 1986

57 

Mason Crosby vs. Iowa State at Ames, November 12, 2005

56 

Mason Crosby vs. Missouri in Boulder, November 5, 2005

56 

Mason Crosby vs. Texas Tech in Boulder, October 14, 2006

55 

Fred Lima vs. California in Boulder, September 9, 1972

55 

Mason Crosby vs. Colorado State in Boulder, September 4, 2004

54 

Jerry Hillebrand vs. Oklahoma State in Boulder, September 30, 1961

54 

Jim Harper vs. Illinois at Champaign, September 15, 1990

54 

Mitch Berger vs. Miami, Fla., in Boulder, September 25, 1993

54 

Mason Crosby vs. Iowa State in Boulder, October 16, 2004

54 

Mason Crosby vs. UTEP in Houston, Dec. 29, 2004 (Houston Bowl).

*Most 50-Yard Field Goals, Career: Mason Crosby 12; Dave DeLine 3, Jim Harper 3, Mitch Berger 2, Pat Blottiaux 2, Tom Field 2, Fred Lima 2.

*Most 50-Yard Field Goals, Season: Mason Crosby 5 (2004); Mason Crosby 5 (2005); Fred Lima 2 (1972), Tom Field 2 (1979), Dave DeLine 2 (1984), Jim Harper 2 (1990), Pat Blottiaux (1992). (*—Regular season only, bowl stats not included; Crosby has one 50-yard FG in bowl action)


THE HONOR

At Colorado’s 2007 spring football game, Crosby became the 25th player in CU football history to have his jersey officially honored and to have his name permanently displayed on the façade of the Fred Casotti Press Box at Folsom Field.

QUOTE: “He is a great kicker. When he came out of high school, you could see he was a really good kicker. He has got that special work ethic; you never have to tell him to go work because he is always driven to get better on his own. When you have that work ethic, talent and desire like he does, then you will be able to succeed. He has got a leg. We’ll see him in the NFL; he’ll be good enough.” – Baltimore Ravens Pro Bowl placekicker Matt Stover, the third-most accurate kicker in NFL history, who coached Mason in high school during summers.


QUOTE II: “Mason Crosby is the best kicker in the history of college football.” - Iowa State head coach Dan McCarney.

advertisement
BUFFSTV
FB
11/27/2014
Thor Eaton Senior Interview
FB
11/26/2014
Kaiwi Crabb Senior Interview
FB
11/26/2014
Kyle Slavin Senior Interview
FB
11/26/2014
Juda Parker Senior Interview
CONNECT WITH THE BUFFS
CONNECT WITH THE BUFFS
BUFFS SPOTLIGHT
Folsom Field Construction Cam: Live views from the construction site.
CU Athletic Hall of Fame Profile: Ski Coach Bob Beattie
CU Athletic Hall of Fame Profile: Track & Field Hurdler Yvonne Scott
Pac-12 Networks Derek McCartney feature.
CU Video's "Seasons" winner of a 2014 Heartland Emmy Award.
Plati-'Tudes: Associate AD David Plati returns with his unique look at all things CU.
Colorado introduces its strategic plan for Athletics.
Buffs unveil more information on new facilities at the spring game.
Denver-based Mortensen Construction & Populous are the design/build team for CU's Athletic Complex...
Learn more about CU's Sustainable Excellence Initiative
Classic CU