MEMBER SIGN IN
Don't have an account? Click Here
INFORMATION FOR BOOSTERS

 

 

Dear Alumni and Friends,

It is an exciting time for Colorado Athletics as expectations are high for all of our programs. Our entire staff is prepared to work hard and achieve the lofty goals we have set for ourselves. We are also committed to you, the dedicated fans and alumni of the University of Colorado, and the unconditional support you provide to our athletic programs.

As the interest and support for CU Athletics continues to grow, so does the responsibility we all have to understand and comply with the rules and regulations established by the NCAA. These rules apply to not only the coaches, staff and university personnel. They apply to all of the friends, fans, ticket holders, and, often, alumni of the University of Colorado. Therefore, the University is directly responsible for any of the actions that you may make relating to any NCAA rules.

This Booster Rules Booklet is designed to provide you with some valuable information and guidelines for a variety of NCAA regulations. As a representative of CU, please take the time to familiarize yourself with the "do's and dont's" listed in this booklet. It is imperative that we all understand the importance of our responsibility to adhere to these rules.

In addition to this information guide, our staff is prepared to assist you at any time with questions you may have. Before you take any action relating to current or prospective student-athletes, please take the time to consult our staff to make sure your actions are in full compliance. Making this small effort will protect the student-athletes' future eligibility and will ensure that you are upholding the reputation of the University of Colorado. Any violations that do occur may result in severe punishment from the NCAA and will jeopardize the future of the CU Athletic Department.

The University of Colorado thanks you for your continued support and understanding. We are proud to have friends like you who have always kept CU's interests first and foremost, and who will continue to maintain the integrity of the University of Colorado. If you have any questions regarding NCAA rules, please contact our Compliance Office at 303-492-6155.

Thank you for your attention to this very important issue. With your assistance, we are looking forward to continued success for the Buffaloes!

Rick George, Director of Intercollegiate Athletics

Q & A topics for the University of Colorado Boulder boosters/donors


Am I booster/donor?

Q: What does it mean to be a "booster/donor" of CU athletics?
A booster/donor is someone who is a representative of the institution's athletics interests. A booster/donor must abide by pertinent NCAA legislation. If a booster/donor does not abide by NCAA rules, student-athletes' future eligibility may be jeopardized, and any violations may result in severe punishment from the NCAA.

Q: Am I considered a representative of CU's athletics interests (a "booster/donor")?
A booster/donor is a person who:

  • Is a member of an organization that promotes CU's athletics interests, such as the Buff Club, or has ever belonged to such a club.
  • Has donated to the Athletics Department or to a CU booster club.
  • Has ever purchased or held season tickets for any sport.
  • Has assisted or is assisting in the recruitment of a student-athlete in any way.
  • Has assisted or is assisting in providing benefits to enrolled student-athletes or their families
  • Is a former student-athlete.

Remember, once you are a representative of CU’s athletics interests, you forever maintain this status.
 
Q: What if I don't currently have season tickets or belong to the Buff Club, but I have in the past?
A person becomes a booster/donor once they meet one of the above conditions, and that distinction always stays with the person.

Back To Top

Who is considered a prospect?

Q: Who is considered a prospective student-athlete (prospect)?
A prospect is a student in the ninth grade or above, including students in prep schools and junior colleges and individuals who have officially withdrawn from four-year schools. Any student not yet in the ninth grade becomes a prospect if an institution provides him/her with any financial aid or other benefits that are not generally provided to prospective students.

Q: How long is a prospective student-athlete considered to be a prospect?
A prospective student-athlete remains a prospect even after committing to or signing a National Letter of Intent with CU or any institution, and both the institution and the prospect continue to be governed by NCAA recruiting legislation regarding prospects until the prospect reports for regular squad practice (e.g. preseason football practice) or the prospect attends his/her first day of classes in any regular term.

Back To Top

Can I contact a prospect?

Q: Can I contact a prospective student-athlete or his/her parents or legal guardians?
No. A booster/donor may not contact a prospect or his/her parents in person, by telephone, in writing or any electronic means of communication. Deliberate contact may not be made with a prospect or his/her parents on or off the CU campus for purposes of recruiting the prospect.  Unavoidable incidental contact does happen and as long as you confine your conversation with the prospect to typical conversation and do not provide the prospect with a “recruiting pitch” you will be fine.
The exception to this NCAA legislation would be if you had a previous and pre-existing relationship with the prospect.  You can contact the CU Athletics Compliance Office to talk about this further. 

Back To Top

Established family friends

Q: What if I am an "established family friend" or neighbor? Can I contact the prospect?
Yes, because a pre-existing relationship with the prospect may trump this NCAA legislation. However, it must be understood that such contacts cannot be made for recruiting purposes and cannot be initiated or arranged by CU staff members. In addition, the established relationship must have occurred prior to the friend or neighbor becoming a prospect.

Back To Top

Telephone contact with a prospect

Q: What if a prospect calls a booster/donor?
A booster/donor may have a telephone conversation with a prospect ONLY if the prospect initiates the call. An institutional staff member may NOT arrange the call and the booster/donor may NOT have a recruiting conversation, but may exhibit normal civility. The booster/donor must refer any questions about the University's athletic program to the Athletic Department.

Q: What if a prospect knows that a booster/donor is a CU graduate and contacts him/her to ask questions about CU?
If a prospect contacts a booster/donor, he/she may answer questions regarding any aspect of CU (such as academics, city of Boulder or campus lifestyle) as long as NO discussion takes place about the CU athletics program. If a prospect asks about CU athletics, refer him/her to a coaching staff member in the CU Athletics Department.

Q: Is it permissible for a booster/donor to telephone a prospect once the prospect has committed to or signed a National Letter of Intent (NLI) with CU?
No. Even if the purpose of the call is only to congratulate the prospect, he/she is still a prospect and the same contact rules that applied before committing or signing still apply. Do not contact a prospect for any reason without first checking with the Athletic Compliance Office, unless the prospect is a relative.

Q: May a booster/donor contact a prospective student-athlete to discuss a summer job?
Yes, but ONLY AFTER the prospect has signed a National Letter of Intent to attend CU. A prospective student-athlete may not be employed until the completion of his/her senior year in high school. Additionally, any such contact must receive prior approval from the Athletic Department. When a prospect is employed, he/she must be paid only for work actually performed and at a rate commensurate with the going rate in that locality for similar services. Remember, employment cannot be promised to a parent/legal guardian of the prospect in order to “induce” the prospect to sign with CU.

Back To Top

Other contact with a prospect

Q: What if a booster/donor makes unavoidable incidental contact with a prospect?
An unavoidable incidental contact with a prospect is permissible provided the contact is not arranged by the booster/donor or an Athletic Department staff member. It must not take place on the grounds of the prospect's educational institution or at the sites of organized competition and practice involving the prospect or the prospect's team. The contact must not be made for the purpose of recruitment, and it must involve only normal civility. The booster/donor must refer any questions about the University's athletic program to the Athletic Department.

Q: May a booster/donor speak to a CU coach if a prospect is with the coach?
If a CU coach is with a prospect, do not approach the coach until the prospect and family have gone elsewhere. Otherwise, the coach will be placed in an awkward situation because he/she will not be able to introduce the prospect to the booster/donor. It is not permissible to allow prospects and boosters to mix, especially when the prospect is on an official or unofficial campus visit or if the CU coach is making a contact with the prospect at their educational institution or competition. If a prospect approaches a booster/donor on or off campus regarding the athletic program, explain that NCAA rules do not permit discussion of the athletic program. Refer the prospect to the appropriate CU coach.

Q: Is it permissible for a booster/donor to contact an enrolled student-athlete from another institution for the purpose of recruiting?
No. Student-athletes at other institutions may not be contacted for purposes of recruitment to CU.

Back To Top

Financial aid/Benefits for a prospect

Q: During recruitment, or prior to an individual's enrollment, can a booster/donor directly or indirectly make arrangements for a prospect, the prospect's relatives, or the prospect's friends to receive money, financial aid, or equivalent inducements? What if similar financial aid, benefits or arrangements are available to prospective students who aren't athletes?
No. Furthermore, it would not be permissible to make such arrangements for current student-athletes at CU.

Q: What are considered "other types of inducements" that are prohibited for prospects, their relatives or friends?
Other types of inducements that are prohibited include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • cash or loans;
  • promise of employment after college education;
  • special discounts or payment arrangements on loans;
  • employment of relatives or friends of prospect;
  • involvement in arrangement for free or reduced charges for professional or personal services, purchases or charges;
  • use of an automobile;
  • providing transportation to or from a summer job or to any other site;
  • signing or co-signing a note for a loan;
  • the loan or gift of money or other tangible items (e.g., clothes, cars, jewelry, electronic/stereo equipment);
  • gifts of any kind;
  • guarantees of bond;
  • purchases of items or services from a prospect or the prospect's family at inflated prices;
  • directly or indirectly providing transportation to enroll in classes;
  • any financial aid other than that administered by CU;
  • the promise of financial aid for post graduate education;
  • free or reduced cost housing arrangements;
  • arrangement for or payment of transportation costs incurred by relatives or friends of a prospective student-athlete;
  • entertainment of a prospect or prospect's family on or off campus;
  • benefits connected with on or off campus housing (e.g., television sets or stereo equipment, specialized recreational facilities);
  • tickets or admission to an athletic, institutional or community event;
  • educational expenses (e.g., typing costs, course supplies, use of a copy machine);
  • registration fees for summer sports camps.

Back To Top

Calling a CU coach about a prospect & participation in recruiting

Q: Is it permissible for a booster/donor to bring to CU's attention outstanding prospects from the representative's local area?

Yes. However, a donor/booster may not get involved in the actual evaluation of the talent of a prospect. In other words, a booster/donor may not contact a prospect's coach, principal, or counselor. They can also not visit the prospect's educational institution to pick up video or transcripts pertaining to the evaluation of the prospect's athletic or academic abilities. In addition, a booster/donor cannot contact the prospect for purposes of soliciting the prospect's enrollment to CU and participation in athletics.

Back To Top

Providing benefits to student-athletes

Q: Is it permissible for a booster/donor to accompany a CU coach when he/she visits the local high school campus?

No. If a booster/donor transports a CU coach from the airport to a high school campus, the booster/donor may not enter the high school with the coach and may not observe prospects.

Q: Is it permissible for a booster/donor to reimburse the prospect's coach for expenses incurred while transporting a prospect to visit campus?

No.

Q: Is it permissible for a booster/donor to entertain high school, preparatory, or junior college coaches at any location?

No. However, it is permissible for CU to provide two complimentary admissions to the coaches for home athletic contests.  Two complimentary admissions are the only permissible material benefit a high school, two –year college coach or prep school coach can receive from CU.

Q: Is it permissible for a booster/donor to provide transportation to or from campus to prospects, their friends or their relatives?

No.

Q: Is it permissible for a booster/donor to provide free admission to the institution's athletic events?

No.

Q: Can student-athletes be provided a benefit that isn't available to the general student body?

No. Under NCAA rules, an extra benefit is any special arrangement by an institutional employee or a booster/donor to provide a student-athlete or the student-athlete's relative or friend a benefit not expressly authorized by NCAA legislation. Receipt of a benefit by student-athletes or their relatives or friends is not a violation of NCAA legislation IF it is demonstrated that the same benefit is generally available to the institution's students or their relatives or friends, or to a particular segment of the student body (e.g., foreign students, minority students, etc.) determined on a basis unrelated to athletic ability.

Q: What are some examples of benefits a booster/donor may not provide to a student-athlete, their relatives or friends?

Types of extra benefits that are prohibited include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • cash or loans; special discounts or payment arrangements on loans;
  • employment of relatives or friends of a student-athlete;
  • involvement in arrangement for free or reduced charges for professional or personal services, purchases or charges;
  • use of an automobile;
  • providing transportation to or from a summer job or to any other site;
  • signing or co-signing a note for a loan; the loan or gift of money or other tangible items (e.g., clothes, cars, jewelry, electronic/stereo equipment);
  • gifts or awards of any kind;
  • guarantees of bond;
  • purchases of items or services from a student-athlete or the student athlete's family at inflated prices;
  • directly or indirectly providing transportation to enroll in classes;
  • any financial aid other than that administered by CU;
  • the promise of financial aid for post graduate education;
  • free or reduced cost housing arrangements;
  • arrangement for or payment of transportation or other costs incurred by relatives or friends of a student-athlete to visit the student-athlete or to attend any contest;
  • entertainment of a student-athlete's family on or off campus;
  • benefits connected with on or off campus housing (e.g., television sets or stereo equipment, specialized recreational facilities);
  • tickets or admission to an athletic, institutional or community event;
  • educational expenses (e.g., typing costs, course supplies, use of a copy machine or computer);
  • payment of any registration fees (e.g., tuition and fees, summer camps, etc.);
  • payment to a student-athlete for use of his/her complimentary admissions or receipt of payment for complimentary admissions that were sold to a third party;
  • use of or pay for long-distance telephone calls;
  • use of or pay for a cell phone or PDA;
  • the purchase of athletic apparel or awards from a student-athlete.

Back To Top

Using a student-athlete’s name or picture

Q: Is it permissible for anyone to use the name or picture of an enrolled student-athlete to directly advertise, recommend or promote sales or use of a commercial product or service of any kind?
No.

Back To Top

 
Providing expenses for a student-athlete to speak at an event

Q: Is it permissible for a student-athlete to receive any expenses for speaking to a booster club or civic organization?
A student-athlete may only accept transportation and meal expenses in conjunction with their participation in a luncheon meeting of a booster club or civic organization, provided the meeting occurs within a 30-mile radius of the institution's main campus and no tangible award is provided to the student-athlete. If the luncheon is outside the 30-mile radius, the student-athlete is not permitted to accept any transportation or meal expenses.

Q: Is it permissible for a booster/donor to provide an honorarium to a student-athlete who has been approved for a speaking engagement?
No. Student-athletes may only receive necessary travel expenses, as stated above, and may not receive an honorarium. All speaking engagements must be approved in advance by the Athletic Department.

Back To Top

Student-athlete’s involvement in promotional activities

Q: Is it permissible for student-athletes to be involved in any type of promotional activities?
It is permissible for student-athletes to be involved in promotional activities for institutional, charitable, educational, or nonprofit agencies provided the activity is given prior approval by CU's Athletic Director.

Click here for more information on promotional activities

Back To Top

Employing a student-athlete

Q: Is it permissible for a booster/donor to employ a student-athlete during the academic year while he/she is enrolled as a full-time student?
A student-athlete receiving a grant-in-aid may receive employment income during the academic year under various situations. The student-athlete must sign a written statement prior to beginning any employment during the academic year. All student-athletes may be employed during the institutional vacation and summer periods. Please note that student-athletes may be compensated only for work actually performed and at a rate commensurate with the going rate in that locality for similar services. If you employ student-athletes, you may be contacted by the Compliance Office for information regarding the employment.

Back To Top

Q: When is a student-athlete no longer a student-athlete?
NCAA legislation states that once a CU student-athlete, always a student-athlete. Even after a student-athlete’s eligibility exhausts, only “reasonable” transportation, lodging and meals may be provided to the former student-athlete.  A donor/booster cannot promise employment, money or any form of a thank you to the former student-athlete for being a Buff.

If you have questions that have not been answered here, visit the Compliance Corner at CUBuffs.com or contact the Compliance Office at 303-492-5390.

advertisement
BUFFSTV
WBB
09/08/2014
Aspire2Inspire
WBB
06/20/2014
Cold Water Challenge Part II
WBB
06/18/2014
Colorado Basketball Camp
WBB
06/17/2014
Colorado Cold Water Challenge
CONNECT WITH THE BUFFS
CONNECT WITH THE BUFFS
BUFFS SPOTLIGHT
Folsom Field Construction Cam: Live views from the construction site.
Plati-'Tudes: Associate AD David Plati returns with his unique look at all things CU.
CUís 2014 Athletic Hall Of Fame Class Welcomes Nine
CU Video's "Seasons" winner of a 2014 Heartland Emmy Award.
The 2013-14 CUSPY Award Winners.
Colorado introduces its strategic plan for Athletics.
Buffs unveil more information on new facilities at the spring game.
Denver-based Mortensen Construction & Populous are the design/build team for CU's Athletic Complex...
Learn more about CU's Sustainable Excellence Initiative
Classic CU